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Iran: There will be no war with the United States of America

Said Ali Shamkhani, secretary-general of the Supreme National Security Council
Said Ali Shamkhani, secretary-general of the Supreme National Security Council

"There will be no military confrontation between Iran and the United States," Supreme National Security Council Secretary-General Ali Shamkhani said Wednesday, according to IRNA news agency.


Fears of a military confrontation between Tehran and Washington have mounted since the attack on two tankers near the Gulf last week.

The United States has accused Iran of responsibility for the attack, but the latter denies it.

"There will be no military confrontation between Iran and America, where there is no reason for a war," Shamkhani said, adding that accusations against other countries have become commonplace among US officials as they try to pressure other countries.

The statements came one day after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that the United States would continue its campaign of pressure on Iran and would continue to deter aggression in the region, but did not want the conflict with Tehran to escalate.

President Trump does not want the war and we will continue to deliver that message while doing what is necessary to protect US interests in the region, "Pompeo told reporters at the Air Force base in Florida:" We have exchanged many messages, even now, to convey to Iran that we are there to deter aggression. "

A Kurdish security man committed suicide at Istanbul's new airport after feeling overwhelmed by shock over his ethnic background.

Ibrahim Lake committed suicide because of his sense of persecution


Turkish media reports that Ibrahim Lake, who works at the newly opened airport in Istanbul, jumped from high altitude to the arrival hall, Monday, was killed.


Before his suicide, Lick wrote a letter on the ING website, saying he had been persecuted for being a Kurd in Turkey.

"We are always excluded because we are Kurds, maybe because of what I will do things will change," he said.

According to the Turkish newspaper "Ahawat", he wanted to marry a Turkish woman, but his request was rejected because of his race. She told him that she would not marry a Kurd.

Security sources said police had opened an investigation into the incident.

The opposition candidate in Istanbul municipal elections, Akram Emamoglu, on Twitter, sent his condolences to the Lake family, noting that "82 million Turks are all equal."

Kurds represent about 20 percent of Turkish society, but they complain of persecution and discrimination under the rule of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

President Trump is suddenly using the word 'treason' a lot


Margaret Sullivan said it best on Sunday's "Reliable Sources" telecast: "Just when we think it really can't get any worse... when he uses terms like 'enemy of the people' or 'fake news...' This actually ratchets it up."
    Yes, indeed. President Trump is now accusing news outlets of "treason" when he doesn't like the stories they publish. On Saturday night he said the "Failing New York Times" committed a "virtual act of Treason" by reporting that the "United States is substantially increasing Cyber Attacks on Russia." He said the story was "NOT TRUE," but treasonous. Hmmm.
    Trump's casual use of the word "treason" is a relatively new development. He tweeted it for the first time last September, in response to the anonymous "senior official" op-ed, also in the NYT. He has used it on Twitter half a dozen times this year. He has also said it repeatedly in interviews and speeches, per Factba.se. But as Sullivan said, this really ratchets it up. On "Reliable," Samantha Vinograd said his tweet about the NYT is talking about "executing journalists," because treason is a death penalty offense. I wouldn't go that far, but her point is well taken. What he's saying is nonsensical, but because he said it, the NYT decided to reply...

    UEFA NATIONS LEAGUE final: Portugal rely on Ronaldo to face the Dutch boom

    Portugal are counting on their superstar Cristiano Ronaldo to face a Dutch team that began to recall its previous beautiful levels, Sunday in Porto in the final of the first edition of the European Football League.

    Portugal are counting on their superstar Cristiano Ronaldo to face a Dutch team that began to recall its previous beautiful levels, Sunday in Porto in the final of the first edition of the European Football League.


    The 34-year-old Ronaldo missed the first round of the youthful competition to focus on his first season with Juventus, but the former Real Madrid star returned in time, scoring a nice 3-0 win over Switzerland 3-1 in the semi-finals on Wednesday.

    Switzerland had a chance to settle the game, but the world's best player five times, with their defense and a 53th haterik record in his brilliant career.

    "This is the preparation - a practical law, I feel good, despite my 34th birthday," Ronaldo told the European Union (WEFA) website.

    "The most important thing is to think, to feel motivated and happy, and to continue my career as a player because I feel my ability to do more."

    Portugal's successful career without goals was promising, with Bernardo Silva, João Felix, 19, Robin Neves and Bruno Fernandez, but when the Don arrives, Portugal's accounts and opponents are different.

    "We know it's sometimes impossible to defend Cristiano Ronaldo well," said Dutch coach Ronald Koman.

    "I think the best we can do is keep the ball, because when we're in possession we can not do anything offensive."

    The Netherlands have continued to compensate for their decline in recent years when they failed to qualify for the 2018 World Cup and the 2016 European Cup. Despite the loss of the "Windmills" match against Germany 2-3 in the European Cup 2020, fans are assured of a return to major competitions.

    The men of coach Koman proved that their victory over France, world champion and Germany in the group stage was not coincidental, as Ajax stars starred the young men who surprised the fans of reaching the semi-finals of the Champions League this season after the exclusion of Real Madrid and defending champion Juventus.
                     
    Van Dyck turned

    Fortunately for Koman, he has the right man to keep Ronaldo out of the net, relying on Liverpool's English Premier League hero Virgil Van Dyke last week.

    The world's most expensive defender has justified his move to the Reds for 75 million pounds ($ 95 million) since coming from Southampton 18 months ago.

     After turning his defense into Liverpool's defense, he will manage to give the Netherlands its first continental title since the 1988 European Cup when he was a defender of Marco van Basten, Ruud Gullit and Frank Rijkaard.

    In the two encounters between Ronaldo (88 goals in 157 internationals) and van Dyck, he won the first in the 2018 Champions League final when Liverpool keeper Carrios made two serious mistakes and Welsh scored Gareth Bale a wonderful goal, and in the second record Van Dyck during the Netherlands friendly against Portugal 3 - Zero in March.

    Luxe Couman has the best European defense duo with Premiership van Dyck, 27, and 19-year-old Matthias de Leicht, a leading European player. Young midfielder Frankie de Jong, who moved to Barcelona in a big deal, In all directions, stressing that it is a special deal for the Catalan team.

    De Liechte made a serious mistake in the semi-final against England, but Ajax defender Amsterdam equalized for the equalizer, before Orange took advantage of the mistakes of the "Three Lions" and settled the game 3-1 after the extension.

    De Licht will try to help van Dyck stop Ronaldo's driver, who in turn is looking for a revenge for the young player who scored against Juventus and contributed to his elimination from the Champions League, as part of the great Ajax, who ended up narrowly against Tottenham Hotspur in the semi-finals.

    But Ronaldo, who is fond of the titles, is standing after a game of adding a new title after the coronation with his country in the European Cup 2016 when he came out of the final injured against France, and trying to avenge the loss of the final of the European Cup 2004 by playing again in front of the fans of his country.

    Before the match, England meet Switzerland in the third place match, in the new competition, which partly replaced the venue of friendly matches in the old continent.

    Georgia House race becomes new battleground in fight over abortion rights

    'Heartbeat' law sets up possible challenge to Roe v. Wade 01:56


    Renee Unterman, the Republican state senator who sponsored Georgia's controversial "heartbeat" bill, announced a run for Congress on Thursday, opening a potential new battleground in the national fight over abortion rights.


    Unterman, 65, is running for a House seat northeast of Atlanta, pitching herself as a conservative with close ties to the district and a record that goes beyond her pro-life views, including combating human trafficking and opioid addiction.
    But Democrats have already pledged to make sure her bill banning abortions after six weeks of pregnancy stays front and center in the House race, testing the political strength of the Republican effort to challenge the Supreme Court's 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that established a woman's right to an abortion.
    "I think the abortion ban bill has already played a huge role in mobilizing Democrats in the state," said Maggie Chambers, the Georgia Democratic Party communications director. "Renee Unterman can't hide from this."
    Georgia is among a number of states that have moved to restrict abortion over the past year, joining Louisiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Mississippi in passing bills to ban abortion after six weeks.

    In May, Missouri passed a bill banning abortion after eight weeks of pregnancy, even in cases of rape and incest, and Alabama passed the country's most restrictive bill, passing an outright ban except when the mother's life is at serious risk or if the "unborn child has a lethal anomaly."
    As Republicans have gone more conservative on the issue, Democrats have become more liberal, passing laws in New York and Vermont to affirm the legal right even if Roe is struck down.
    A House race in Illinois between Rep. Dan Lipinski, one of the last Democrats in Congress who has opposed abortion rights, and Marie Newman, his progressive challenger, could be defined by the issue. And in Virginia, Democratic legislators earlier this year tried and failed to pass a bill that would have removed some restrictions on abortion in the third trimester.
    Political opportunity for Democrats?
    Democrats in Georgia view Unterman's bill as a political opportunity, pointing to national and local polls showing Americans are more likely to favor abortion rights than not.
    As an issue, abortion appears to hold more political sway than in recent elections. A new CNN poll showed that thirty percent of Americans would only vote for a candidate for major political office who shares their views on abortion, higher than at any point since CNN first polled the topic in 1996.

    Unterman's bill has reverberated around the country and been met by a swift backlash from Hollywood.
    Georgia's Republican Governor Brian Kemp postponed a trip to Los Angeles to promote his state's film industry after movie executives and celebrities vowed to boycott working in his state. His Democratic opponent in 2018, Stacey Abrams, and Ilyse Hogue, the president of NARAL Pro-Choice America, are scheduled to go to LA next week to urge them to not boycott Georgia but instead back candidates opposing the bill.
    Two abortion rights groups groups -- NARAL Pro-Choice Georgia and Planned Parenthood Southeast Advocates -- have announced a six-figure campaign to oust state legislators who supported the bill.
    While it might help Kemp with his political base in rural Georgia, Democrats say the abortion bill could hurt Republicans like Unterman who seeks to represent the historically conservative yet increasingly diverse district. The retiring five-term Rep. Rob Woodall won his reelection race by fewer than 500 votes in 2018.
    Carolyn Bourdeaux, the Democratic challenger, is running again.
    Bourdeaux, a Georgia State University professor who will face state House Rep. Brenda Lopez Romero and other Democrats in the primary, told CNN that the abortion bill is the "tip of the spear" in her campaign's message on health care.
    "It is something that obviously deeply angers women," Bourdeaux said. "I don't think we expected to be relitigating the 1960s and 1970s here in the 21st century."
    Zac McCrary, a Democratic pollster working for Bourdeaux, views the heartbeat bill as another Republican misfire in the culture wars, on par with a 2016 "religious liberty" bill giving greater legal protections to deny services to members of the LGBT community that then-Gov. Nathan Deal vetoed amid backlash from the business community.
    In an implicit rebuke to critics of her abortion bill, Unterman's campaign launch on Thursday evening was marked by the support of women, who gave the prayer, Pledge of Allegiance, and spoke on her behalf. Unterman's speech focused on issues uniting conservatives before and after the Trump era, calling for a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution, to fix a broken health care system and build the border wall.
    In alluding to her abortion fight, Unterman claimed she had the courage to fight for "the most vulnerable citizens of our society" including the unborn and said she would "promote a culture that honors life."

    Unterman's bill has reverberated around the country and been met by a swift backlash from Hollywood.
    Georgia's Republican Governor Brian Kemp postponed a trip to Los Angeles to promote his state's film industry after movie executives and celebrities vowed to boycott working in his state. His Democratic opponent in 2018, Stacey Abrams, and Ilyse Hogue, the president of NARAL Pro-Choice America, are scheduled to go to LA next week to urge them to not boycott Georgia but instead back candidates opposing the bill.
    Two abortion rights groups groups -- NARAL Pro-Choice Georgia and Planned Parenthood Southeast Advocates -- have announced a six-figure campaign to oust state legislators who supported the bill.
    While it might help Kemp with his political base in rural Georgia, Democrats say the abortion bill could hurt Republicans like Unterman who seeks to represent the historically conservative yet increasingly diverse district. The retiring five-term Rep. Rob Woodall won his reelection race by fewer than 500 votes in 2018.
    Carolyn Bourdeaux, the Democratic challenger, is running again.
    Bourdeaux, a Georgia State University professor who will face state House Rep. Brenda Lopez Romero and other Democrats in the primary, told CNN that the abortion bill is the "tip of the spear" in her campaign's message on health care.
    "It is something that obviously deeply angers women," Bourdeaux said. "I don't think we expected to be relitigating the 1960s and 1970s here in the 21st century."
    Zac McCrary, a Democratic pollster working for Bourdeaux, views the heartbeat bill as another Republican misfire in the culture wars, on par with a 2016 "religious liberty" bill giving greater legal protections to deny services to members of the LGBT community that then-Gov. Nathan Deal vetoed amid backlash from the business community.
    In an implicit rebuke to critics of her abortion bill, Unterman's campaign launch on Thursday evening was marked by the support of women, who gave the prayer, Pledge of Allegiance, and spoke on her behalf. Unterman's speech focused on issues uniting conservatives before and after the Trump era, calling for a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution, to fix a broken health care system and build the border wall.
    In alluding to her abortion fight, Unterman claimed she had the courage to fight for "the most vulnerable citizens of our society" including the unborn and said she would "promote a culture that honors life."
    Unterman ended her speech to Martina McBride's "This One's For The Girls" and invited women on stage to dance. But behind them a small group of protesters, who stood on a low brick wall to be seen above Unterman supporters, bopped along, waving signs for safe, legal abortions.
    Some of Unterman's supporters think her bill will help her in the House Republican primary against Lynne Homrich, a former Home Depot executive, and other Republicans. Rep. Doug Collins, a Republican representing Georgia in the US House, said if state House Rep. Todd Jones runs, the GOP primary will likely have to hold a run-off election, which occurs when no candidate wins a majority of votes. (An adviser for Homrich did not reply to a request for comment asking about her position on the "heartbeat" bill.)
    Georgia Senate President Pro Tempore Butch Miller told CNN of the bill: "I will tell you this: there was no stronger advocate for it than Renee Unterman."
    "She was the one who got it across the finish line," Miller continued.
    But when asked how Unterman's support of the legislation would fare in the general election, he said, "You can't win all the games until you win the first game."
    "Right now, you're going to focus on the primary," he added.
    For her part, Bourdeaux said she supported the framework found by the Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade, which essentially forbid regulation of first-trimester abortions and allowed for states to regulate abortions in the second trimester and prohibit abortions in the third trimester, except if it was necessary to preserve the woman's health. Later Supreme Court rulings have altered that framework.
    "What I do not believe in is putting women in prison for having an abortion after six weeks," Bourdeaux said.

    Real Madrid confirm Eden Hazard shirt number - by selling it in club shop!



    Real Madrid have once again teased fans ahead of Eden Hazard’s eagerly-awaited arrival at the Bernabeu - by selling his No.7 shirt at one of their official club shops.


    The Spanish giants are understood to have agreed what could rise to a club-record fee to sign Eden Hazard from Chelsea .


    Madrid have agreed a package for Belgium star Hazard that could rise as high as £130million when all the bonus payments are included.

    The Blues board will view the outcome of lengthy negotiations with Madrid as a success, as Real had been reluctant to pay more than £88million.

    The basic fee for Hazard is expected to reach £100million, the sum for which Chelsea had been holding out despite the 28-year-old entering the final year of his Stamford Bridge contract.

    While the move has not officially been confirmed yet, Madrid are already displaying his new shirt in their official club shop in Barcelona Airport.

    Pictures emerged on social media that showed the shirt hanging beside Sergio Ramos’ jersey.

    Hazard looks set to leave Chelsea after seven years having won two Premier League titles, one FA Cup and one League Cup - and two Europa League crowns.

    The forward spearheaded Chelsea's 4-1 Europa League final win over Arsenal in Baku last month, then immediately admitted he expected his time at Stamford Bridge to come to an end.

    "I think it's a goodbye," said Hazard in Baku. "My dream was to play in the Premier League, I did it for seven years.


    "Maybe it's time for a new challenge."

    Hazard joined Chelsea from Lille in 2012, and in his final campaign at Stamford Bridge he became just the fourth man in Premier League history to score and assist at least 15 goals in a season.

    Chelsea had long been resigned to Hazard leaving the club once he had rejected all offers of a contract extension.


    But with one year left on his existing deal Chelsea will have concluded a fine piece of business with Real meeting their asking price.

    Zinedine Zidane's overhaul of the Madrid squad should also now continue at pace.

    Real have already signed Eintracht Frankfurt striker Luka Jovic for £62million, and have designs on luring Spurs' Christian Eriksen to the Bernabeu.


    US Defense Secretary: Turkey will not get an F-35 if it buys the S-400


    Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Chanahan confirmed that "Turkey will not get an F-35 if it buys the Russian defense system S400," adding that "Turkey's participation in the F-35 program will be suspended by July 31 ".


    "Turkish students participating in F35 training courses will not be able to complete training courses and we will not recommend starting new courses," he said. "There is a bipartisan plan in Congress to impose sanctions on Turkey under the Anti-Enemies Act America in the event of Turkey's acquisition of the S400, "adding that" the S400 deal will hinder the strengthening or maintenance of Turkey's cooperation with the United States and even with "NATO."

    "US President Donald Trump promised to boost bilateral trade with Turkey from $ 20 billion to $ 75 billion, but it would be a challenge if the United States imposed sanctions under the Anti-American Enemies Act," he said, adding that "most Turkish students Participants in F35 training courses will not be able to complete the training courses and we will not recommend starting new courses. "

    "The Turkish S-400 missile system has been manufactured and will be delivered to Ankara within two months," he said, adding that Turkish military personnel had been trained to use the system.

    The Pentagon has announced that it "gives Turkey until July 31 to retract the Russian S400 missile deal."